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crown knot paracord leash

Crown knot paracord dog leash

This time we take on another paracord dog leash!

While many of my dog leashes are braided, this one is constructed out of knots. Specifically, the main part of it is made using crown knots. 4 strands are worked to produce a fairly thick dog leash.

In fact, even though I used 4 strand, this leash is as thick as an 8 strand braided leash would be! This is also reflected in the amount of cord it uses up, but more on that later.

paracord-dog-leash-crown-knots

Personally I think this style of a dog leash is a must try for anyone making paracord leashes. It is like a right of passage, a test of patience.

crown-knot-paracord-dog-leash

The dog leash requires quite a few crown knots for a proper length. Because of this it quite time consuming as well. I could have braided at least 2 leashes in the time I used to make this one using knots.

On the up side, it is an incredibly comfortable leash as well as it looks surprisingly good, at least to me.

So, I have prepared a description as well as a video that will guide you through the entire process of making one of these.

Let’s start with the supplies.

Supplies

You will need these few items to create a 3.5 foot leash.

  • paracord 550. Two cords, each 39.5 feet long. For a 2 color version each cord is of a different color
  • two additional smaller pieces of paracord 550, each 3 feet long
  • a swivel snap hook (used to snap the leash onto a collar)
  • lacing needle (you can make one yourself fairly easily)
  • scissors
  • lighter.

Surprisingly, not many different tools are needed. So, now let’s move on to the tying process.

paracord-dog-leash-tutorial

Tying tutorial

We start by feeding the ends of the longer cords (39.5 feet each) through the swivel snap hook. We make sure that all 4 ends are of equal length.

Then we tie a 4 strand Matthew Walker knot right next to the snap hook.

Then we start our many, many crown knots. We work until we have about 3 feet in our working ends remaining.

At that point bend the leash into itself to create a handle.

The next step is to work in the 4 ends into the crown knots. We have 4 ends and there are 4 ends in the leash. With each end I follow one of the cords in the leash (just like splicing a braid).

After a short distance (1.5-2 inches) a multi strand herringbone knot is tied with the 4 ends to cover the section where we just worked in our cords.

Finally the two shorter ends are used to create a small 4 strand herringbone knot right next to the Matthew Walker knot we did at the start.

But it is much easier to see the tying process in action, so a full tutorial is available:

Enjoy making this leash! Be sure to ask if any issues arise.

About Markwell

I am a defense science graduate. I like to create beautiful things out of paracord.

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